Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures
Mary Baker Eddy

CHAPTER 6 - Science, Theology, Medicine

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which Hippocrates has done, by first marking Nature with his name, and afterward letting her loose upon sick people."

Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse, Professor in Harvard University, declared himself "sick of learned quackery."

Dr. James Johnson, Surgeon to William IV, King of England, said:

"I declare my conscientious opinion, founded on long observation and reflection, that if there were not a single physician, surgeon, apothecary, man - midwife, chemist, druggist, or drug on the face of the earth, there would be less sickness and less mortality."

Dr. Mason Good, a learned Professor in London, said:

"The effects of medicine on the human system are in the highest degree uncertain; except, indeed, that it has already destroyed more lives than war, pestilence, and famine, all combined."

Dr. Chapman, Professor of the Institutes and Practice of Physic in the University of Pennsylvania, in a published essay said:

"Consulting the records of our science, we cannot help being disgusted with the multitude of hypotheses obtruded upon us at different times. Nowhere is the imagination displayed to a greater extent; and perhaps so ample an exhibition of human invention might gratify our vanity, if it were not more than compensated by the humiliating view of so much absurdity, contradiction, and falsehood. To harmonize the contrarieties of medical doctrines is indeed a task as impracticable as to arrange the fleeting vapors around us, or to reconcile the fixed and repulsive antipathies of nature. Dark and

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